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Image Image Detail Jury
No.
Entry
No.
Title Material / Media Size  Year  Statement
1a
 
 
1a
 
283a
 
Gen X
 
Encaustic , letrapress and oils on panel
 
12" x 12"
 
2016
 
I have studied and worked in medical science for many years. Science has always interested me with it’s mysterious language of equations, charts, schematics and specimens. The sciences attempt to explain everything by use of a cryptic almost hieroglyphic language is fascinating and even beautiful in its mystery and depth. My work references this idea, visually and conceptually. The work submitted specifically references a laboratory technique known as chromatography.
b   1b 283b On the Spectrum Encaustic, oils, letrapress and aluminum powder on panel 12" x 12" 2016 I have studied and worked in medical science for many years. Science has always interested me with it’s mysterious language of equations, charts, schematics and specimens. The sciences attempt to explain everything by use of a cryptic almost hieroglyphic language is fascinating and even beautiful in its mystery and depth. My work references this idea, visually and conceptually. The work submitted specifically references a laboratory technique known as chromatography.
2a   2a 285a Wedding Guests Inkjet Print 18" x 24" 2015 A photograph revels as much about the photographer as it does the photographed. While walking on urban streets or far off places my camera is with me to record images of people that attract my attention. From Buenos Aires to Berlin. From Auckland to Havana. From  Athens to Lima my pictures tell the story of the people I meet along the way.
2b   2b 285b The Jade Trade Inkjet Print 18" x 24" 2015 A photograph revels as much about the photographer as it does the photographed. While walking on urban streets or far off places my camera is with me to record images of people that attract my attention. From Buenos Aires to Berlin. From Auckland to Havana. From  Athens to Lima my pictures tell the story of the people I meet along the way.
3a   3a 286a Puzzled Oil on Canvas 30" x 24" 2015 I like to explore and experiment with different styles and techniques ranging from realism to expressionism but my favorite material is oil. My oil paintings are psychological explorations, of others and of myself. My Portrait series includes realistic portraits of great artists, writers, poets, musicians. I chose my subjects not just based on whom I admire but whom I can identify myself with on certain levels. For me it is also a psychological study, to make a thorough research on my subject`s personality, to dig as deep as possible into their art and to live and breathe who they are in order to bring out the most realistic expression and reflection of their inner being as well as -consciously or not- my own.  For me painting is communication and self expression without words, but I want people to feel free to interpret my art as they will. They can see themselves in them.
In my Time series I am exploring the relationship between time and people. Is it our friend or our enemy? How does time affect people? Is the end a new beginning? Is time linear?  Is it universal or personal? My latest pieces reflect more on my inner world and how my spiritual and emotional experiences could be interpreted on canvas or paper in a figurative manner.
3b   3b 286b Blues Oil on Canvas 20" x 16" 2016 I like to explore and experiment with different styles and techniques ranging from realism to expressionism but my favorite material is oil. My oil paintings are psychological explorations, of others and of myself. My Portrait series includes realistic portraits of great artists, writers, poets, musicians. I chose my subjects not just based on whom I admire but whom I can identify myself with on certain levels. For me it is also a psychological study, to make a thorough research on my subject`s personality, to dig as deep as possible into their art and to live and breathe who they are in order to bring out the most realistic expression and reflection of their inner being as well as -consciously or not- my own.  For me painting is communication and self expression without words, but I want people to feel free to interpret my art as they will. They can see themselves in them.
In my Time series I am exploring the relationship between time and people. Is it our friend or our enemy? How does time affect people? Is the end a new beginning? Is time linear?  Is it universal or personal? My latest pieces reflect more on my inner world and how my spiritual and emotional experiences could be interpreted on canvas or paper in a figurative manner.
4a   4a 289a Effervescent Atmosphere_Evening Song Mixed: collage papers, lumiere paint, acrylic, gold leaf 40" x 40" 2014 We all have difficult paths to take during our lives. For me, the latest was a diagnosis of epilepsy in my “vintage” years. A challenge was how the medication would affect what I treasured most – the act of creating in my studio.  The reason this became a challenge was because my usual way of getting started with a new piece was finding a story within me to tell visually. The pieces that emerged were usually explored on large canvases and done with free abandonment. Moreover, the pieces were mostly based on something not seen but felt, and then expressed in a visual form.   Now, however, I found the thought of large size to be unnerving and, for the first time, I wanted to work within a set boundary.
We surely find another dimension of knowledge as we experience a new path we find ourselves taking, and this one artistically revealed itself in a very interesting manner. My mind now seemed to want to puzzle out how to work on a small scale and make a fusion of line and shape.  The small square pieces of paper I chose as my new medium seemed to challenge me to start with a single line and go from there within the paper’s borders – a puzzle to be solved, and a surprisingly relaxing one for me as this had never been something I had thought about before. Also, I had never done a self portrait, and the work that evolved from these efforts, which I call Zentangled, presented itself as a gift to me – a new way of exploring and expressing. Image 4 is an enlargement, reworked, of one of the small square pieces that went into Image 3.
4b   4b 289b Effervescent Atmosphere_Sunset Mixed: collage papers, lumiere paint, acrylic 36" x 48" 2016 We all have difficult paths to take during our lives. For me, the latest was a diagnosis of epilepsy in my “vintage” years. A challenge was how the medication would affect what I treasured most – the act of creating in my studio.  The reason this became a challenge was because my usual way of getting started with a new piece was finding a story within me to tell visually. The pieces that emerged were usually explored on large canvases and done with free abandonment. Moreover, the pieces were mostly based on something not seen but felt, and then expressed in a visual form.   Now, however, I found the thought of large size to be unnerving and, for the first time, I wanted to work within a set boundary.
We surely find another dimension of knowledge as we experience a new path we find ourselves taking, and this one artistically revealed itself in a very interesting manner. My mind now seemed to want to puzzle out how to work on a small scale and make a fusion of line and shape.  The small square pieces of paper I chose as my new medium seemed to challenge me to start with a single line and go from there within the paper’s borders – a puzzle to be solved, and a surprisingly relaxing one for me as this had never been something I had thought about before. Also, I had never done a self portrait, and the work that evolved from these efforts, which I call Zentangled, presented itself as a gift to me – a new way of exploring and expressing. Image 4 is an enlargement, reworked, of one of the small square pieces that went into Image 3.
4c   4c 289c Zentangled India ink, puzzle pieces 38" x 29" 2016 We all have difficult paths to take during our lives. For me, the latest was a diagnosis of epilepsy in my “vintage” years. A challenge was how the medication would affect what I treasured most – the act of creating in my studio.  The reason this became a challenge was because my usual way of getting started with a new piece was finding a story within me to tell visually. The pieces that emerged were usually explored on large canvases and done with free abandonment. Moreover, the pieces were mostly based on something not seen but felt, and then expressed in a visual form.   Now, however, I found the thought of large size to be unnerving and, for the first time, I wanted to work within a set boundary.
We surely find another dimension of knowledge as we experience a new path we find ourselves taking, and this one artistically revealed itself in a very interesting manner. My mind now seemed to want to puzzle out how to work on a small scale and make a fusion of line and shape.  The small square pieces of paper I chose as my new medium seemed to challenge me to start with a single line and go from there within the paper’s borders – a puzzle to be solved, and a surprisingly relaxing one for me as this had never been something I had thought about before. Also, I had never done a self portrait, and the work that evolved from these efforts, which I call Zentangled, presented itself as a gift to me – a new way of exploring and expressing. Image 4 is an enlargement, reworked, of one of the small square pieces that went into Image 3.
4d   4d 289d Zentagle #2 India ink 37" x 44" 2016 We all have difficult paths to take during our lives. For me, the latest was a diagnosis of epilepsy in my “vintage” years. A challenge was how the medication would affect what I treasured most – the act of creating in my studio.  The reason this became a challenge was because my usual way of getting started with a new piece was finding a story within me to tell visually. The pieces that emerged were usually explored on large canvases and done with free abandonment. Moreover, the pieces were mostly based on something not seen but felt, and then expressed in a visual form.   Now, however, I found the thought of large size to be unnerving and, for the first time, I wanted to work within a set boundary.
We surely find another dimension of knowledge as we experience a new path we find ourselves taking, and this one artistically revealed itself in a very interesting manner. My mind now seemed to want to puzzle out how to work on a small scale and make a fusion of line and shape.  The small square pieces of paper I chose as my new medium seemed to challenge me to start with a single line and go from there within the paper’s borders – a puzzle to be solved, and a surprisingly relaxing one for me as this had never been something I had thought about before. Also, I had never done a self portrait, and the work that evolved from these efforts, which I call Zentangled, presented itself as a gift to me – a new way of exploring and expressing. Image 4 is an enlargement, reworked, of one of the small square pieces that went into Image 3.
5a   5a 290a Sarimanok swirl 1 Mixed media- oil & acrylic on canvas 24"x 36" 2015 As a traveling visual artist, I gave primary emphasis on the rigors of life experiences every time I create something as my craft. This craft along painting that I deftly turned into an art all these years, which itself is a clear-cut recognition of my artistic abilities. Such that I always thought to be an artist by every one who has encountered and seen my existing works. A series of ongoing and continuing experiences has been the well spring of my inspiration, the main source of materials that I, in turn, continue to have become grown very familiar with whenever I see samples of art.

As an art practitioner. the portrayal of the exotic Sarimanok in my paintings comes in legendary symbols of a bird from the Maranao people who originate from Mindanao, a major island in the Philippines where I currently lived. It comes from the words "sari" and "manok." "Sari" means cloth or garment, which is generally of assorted colors. Manòk means "chicken". This bird has become a ubiquitous symbol of Maranao art. It is depicted as a fowl with colorful wings and feathered tail, holding a fish on its beak or talons.It is said to be a symbol of good fortune. The sarimanok is a legendary bird in full color that project the nationalistic spirit of Filipinos.
5b   5b 290b Sarimanok chant 2 Mixed media- oil & acrylic on canvas 24"x 36" 2015 As a traveling visual artist, I gave primary emphasis on the rigors of life experiences every time I create something as my craft. This craft along painting that I deftly turned into an art all these years, which itself is a clear-cut recognition of my artistic abilities. Such that I always thought to be an artist by every one who has encountered and seen my existing works. A series of ongoing and continuing experiences has been the well spring of my inspiration, the main source of materials that I, in turn, continue to have become grown very familiar with whenever I see samples of art.

As an art practitioner. the portrayal of the exotic Sarimanok in my paintings comes in legendary symbols of a bird from the Maranao people who originate from Mindanao, a major island in the Philippines where I currently lived. It comes from the words "sari" and "manok." "Sari" means cloth or garment, which is generally of assorted colors. Manòk means "chicken". This bird has become a ubiquitous symbol of Maranao art. It is depicted as a fowl with colorful wings and feathered tail, holding a fish on its beak or talons.It is said to be a symbol of good fortune. The sarimanok is a legendary bird in full color that project the nationalistic spirit of Filipinos.
6 6d 6 291a Gender Chess 3D Printer 19" x 19" x 6" 2016 The narrative behind the piece has always held the highest fascination for me. In this exploration, the technical, while important, has a supporting role in the creation of the artwork. I enjoy the use of new materials in the construction of the work but always it’s the story behind the work that is my focus.
7a   7a 295a Spring Dew Mixed Media on Wood

12" x 12"

 

2014 A Philadelphia based artist driven by memories, Diana Balderson interprets portraiture through vivid imagery and contrast, experiencing every day circumstances and creating new images from those puzzle pieces. There is a disconnect within her artwork - the feeling of being alone in a sea of people, both a comfort and a feeling of tension within the same atmosphere. Like coming across a stranger who gives you direct eye contact, giving birth to a new connection, leaving room for recognition and adding to our memory. Her paintings and drawings cause an emotional response from the viewer, often reminding them of their own memoirs. Diana’s series centers around this idea - a solitary stranger, surrounded by a sea of abstract color and texture overlapped and interlaced, flashing in our minds like Christmas lights wrapped around a tree. Sometimes memories are a blur of color and shape, but other times we remember every outline and every contour. Diana won first place in her first juried show right after graduating in 2012 with a Fine Arts Degree from Kutztown University. She has continued to show her work four to five times a year, including three different states and appearing in two art publications. You can see her full resume and collection of completed artwork on her website at: www.dianabalderson.com.
7b   7b 295b Amethyst Oil, Acrylic, and Ink on Wood 12" x 12" 2015 A Philadelphia based artist driven by memories, Diana Balderson interprets portraiture through vivid imagery and contrast, experiencing every day circumstances and creating new images from those puzzle pieces. There is a disconnect within her artwork - the feeling of being alone in a sea of people, both a comfort and a feeling of tension within the same atmosphere. Like coming across a stranger who gives you direct eye contact, giving birth to a new connection, leaving room for recognition and adding to our memory. Her paintings and drawings cause an emotional response from the viewer, often reminding them of their own memoirs. Diana’s series centers around this idea - a solitary stranger, surrounded by a sea of abstract color and texture overlapped and interlaced, flashing in our minds like Christmas lights wrapped around a tree. Sometimes memories are a blur of color and shape, but other times we remember every outline and every contour. Diana won first place in her first juried show right after graduating in 2012 with a Fine Arts Degree from Kutztown University. She has continued to show her work four to five times a year, including three different states and appearing in two art publications. You can see her full resume and collection of completed artwork on her website at: www.dianabalderson.com.
8a   8a 297a Anemone Photograph 11" x 14" 2014 As my hobbies include SCUBA diving and photography, it was a natural for me to start photographing aquatic and marine life.  I travel the world searching for unique underwater subjects to photograph, from Bonaire and Curacao to Indonesia, Palau and Hawaii, and most locations in between. Even off of the coast of New Jersey and the quarries of Pennsylvania, there are opportunities to photograph marine life.
I utilize very specialized underwater photographic equipment, including a specifically designed underwater camera, encased in a watertight housing with two speed lights attached. I utilize a small modeling light for night time photography and a wide angle lens that I can actually put on and take off of the camera underwater. The general approach that I have adopted for underwater photography is: get close, use a wide angle lens, get low and shoot upward toward the light, or use a speed light. I then digitally manipulate and enhance the photograph to create surreal aquatic scenes.
6b   8b 297b Tube Coral Photograph 11" x 14" 2013 As my hobbies include SCUBA diving and photography, it was a natural for me to start photographing aquatic and marine life.  I travel the world searching for unique underwater subjects to photograph, from Bonaire and Curacao to Indonesia, Palau and Hawaii, and most locations in between. Even off of the coast of New Jersey and the quarries of Pennsylvania, there are opportunities to photograph marine life.
I utilize very specialized underwater photographic equipment, including a specifically designed underwater camera, encased in a watertight housing with two speed lights attached. I utilize a small modeling light for night time photography and a wide angle lens that I can actually put on and take off of the camera underwater. The general approach that I have adopted for underwater photography is: get close, use a wide angle lens, get low and shoot upward toward the light, or use a speed light. I then digitally manipulate and enhance the photograph to create surreal aquatic scenes.
8c   8c 297c Porcupine Fish Photograph 11" x 14" 2015 As my hobbies include SCUBA diving and photography, it was a natural for me to start photographing aquatic and marine life.  I travel the world searching for unique underwater subjects to photograph, from Bonaire and Curacao to Indonesia, Palau and Hawaii, and most locations in between. Even off of the coast of New Jersey and the quarries of Pennsylvania, there are opportunities to photograph marine life.
I utilize very specialized underwater photographic equipment, including a specifically designed underwater camera, encased in a watertight housing with two speed lights attached. I utilize a small modeling light for night time photography and a wide angle lens that I can actually put on and take off of the camera underwater. The general approach that I have adopted for underwater photography is: get close, use a wide angle lens, get low and shoot upward toward the light, or use a speed light. I then digitally manipulate and enhance the photograph to create surreal aquatic scenes.
8d   8d 297d Queen Angel Fish Photograph 11" x 14" 2015 As my hobbies include SCUBA diving and photography, it was a natural for me to start photographing aquatic and marine life.  I travel the world searching for unique underwater subjects to photograph, from Bonaire and Curacao to Indonesia, Palau and Hawaii, and most locations in between. Even off of the coast of New Jersey and the quarries of Pennsylvania, there are opportunities to photograph marine life.
I utilize very specialized underwater photographic equipment, including a specifically designed underwater camera, encased in a watertight housing with two speed lights attached. I utilize a small modeling light for night time photography and a wide angle lens that I can actually put on and take off of the camera underwater. The general approach that I have adopted for underwater photography is: get close, use a wide angle lens, get low and shoot upward toward the light, or use a speed light. I then digitally manipulate and enhance the photograph to create surreal aquatic scenes.
9a   9a 300a Fall Nights Mixed Media 6"x8" 2016 For as long as I can remember I have been making art. While I did have a number of other interests art was always there while other things fell away, and when it came time to do something after high school naturally I only looked at art schools. Now that I have a BFA art has become all that I do. After academic classes I make art. After I get home from my day job I make art. Whenever I am not making art I am thinking about making art.

The work I make is made to attempts to tell the story of humans while still inside the story of humanity. I understand that sounds odd but my work covers a vast ranges of topics chief of these topics include perspective, culture and spirituality as well as touching on more subjects. Not stopping with subject my work crosses over mediums too. People have called me a painter, a photographer, an illustrator, a printer and a designer as my work has aspects of all these fields but does not settle into specific area. I’m not an 8th generation abstract expressionist, a 10th generation surrealist, I am just a first generation me.
9b   9b 300b 1993 Mixed Media 8"x6" 2016 For as long as I can remember I have been making art. While I did have a number of other interests art was always there while other things fell away, and when it came time to do something after high school naturally I only looked at art schools. Now that I have a BFA art has become all that I do. After academic classes I make art. After I get home from my day job I make art. Whenever I am not making art I am thinking about making art.

The work I make is made to attempts to tell the story of humans while still inside the story of humanity. I understand that sounds odd but my work covers a vast ranges of topics chief of these topics include perspective, culture and spirituality as well as touching on more subjects. Not stopping with subject my work crosses over mediums too. People have called me a painter, a photographer, an illustrator, a printer and a designer as my work has aspects of all these fields but does not settle into specific area. I’m not an 8th generation abstract expressionist, a 10th generation surrealist, I am just a first generation me.
10a   10a 302a Carousel Of Miracles n.1 Acrylic painting 36" x 24" 2016 I believe in the mystical power of the painted image, in the seduction of evocative photography. My creations are mindful, ironic, and tap into the collective consciousness through a very personal perspective. The use of iconographic disestablishment and cultural (mis)appropriation is often instrumental to my work, which has often a lot to do with religious imagery used outside of the original context, aimed to stimulate critical thinking and open dialog.
10b   10b 302b Carousel Of Miracles n.2 Acrylic painting 36" x 24" 2016 I believe in the mystical power of the painted image, in the seduction of evocative photography. My creations are mindful, ironic, and tap into the collective consciousness through a very personal perspective. The use of iconographic disestablishment and cultural (mis)appropriation is often instrumental to my work, which has often a lot to do with religious imagery used outside of the original context, aimed to stimulate critical thinking and open dialog.
11a   11a 304a Songbirds Mixed Media Acrylic Collage 15"x30" 2015 The work of this artist is heavily influenced by her meditation practice. She practices daily and conducts a weekly retreat out of her home. The deeper states of consciousness she reaches in meditation infuse her artwork with a clarity and resonance that grows with each year of her studies. Her subjects often include the figure in meditation or prayer, with images communicating serenity and peace. In addition, her many landscapes are influenced by the pristine quality that is found only in communing deeply with nature. Her work is influenced by the local nature of parks and landscapes of the city.
Her education started at the drawing studio of the late and great Jeffrey K. Fisher. She grew immensely under his tutelage, and continues to grow in the spirit of his work and work ethic. Currently, she is pursuing a second bachelor's degree in Fine Arts at Queens College. Her work was exhibited at the April 2015 Spring Show at Paper Doll Vintage in Sayville, NY. In March of 2016 her work was exhibited in a duel exhibit with Erica Fairfull at Harborfields Library on Long Island.
11b   11b 304b Japanese Soldier Watercolor 12"x16" 2014 The work of this artist is heavily influenced by her meditation practice. She practices daily and conducts a weekly retreat out of her home. The deeper states of consciousness she reaches in meditation infuse her artwork with a clarity and resonance that grows with each year of her studies. Her subjects often include the figure in meditation or prayer, with images communicating serenity and peace. In addition, her many landscapes are influenced by the pristine quality that is found only in communing deeply with nature. Her work is influenced by the local nature of parks and landscapes of the city.
Her education started at the drawing studio of the late and great Jeffrey K. Fisher. She grew immensely under his tutelage, and continues to grow in the spirit of his work and work ethic. Currently, she is pursuing a second bachelor's degree in Fine Arts at Queens College. Her work was exhibited at the April 2015 Spring Show at Paper Doll Vintage in Sayville, NY. In March of 2016 her work was exhibited in a duel exhibit with Erica Fairfull at Harborfields Library on Long Island.
12a   12a 305a Uncovering the Matriarch Mixed Media- Acrylic, watercolor, pastel, paper 18"x14" 2016 The mixed media nature of my artwork is a celebration of the variety of materials (both traditional and unconventional art supplies) that can be used to create. Creating art is not just about the visual image that emerges, it is an ongoing exploration of how the materials work together. The soft textures of different types of paper, the varying movements of brushstrokes, the residue left behind by pastels, paint, charcoal, etc. As I create, I am often drawn to the feminine. Female figures, soft shapes, fluid and expressive lines come to life. This has almost always been the case. The imagery is rooted in my connection to the feminine and the complex issues, emotions, and desires that linger beneath the surface.
12b   12b 305b In the shadows Mixed Media-Acrylic, watercolor, pastel, paper, wax 24"x18" 2016 The mixed media nature of my artwork is a celebration of the variety of materials (both traditional and unconventional art supplies) that can be used to create. Creating art is not just about the visual image that emerges, it is an ongoing exploration of how the materials work together. The soft textures of different types of paper, the varying movements of brushstrokes, the residue left behind by pastels, paint, charcoal, etc. As I create, I am often drawn to the feminine. Female figures, soft shapes, fluid and expressive lines come to life. This has almost always been the case. The imagery is rooted in my connection to the feminine and the complex issues, emotions, and desires that linger beneath the surface.
13a   13a 307a Suite 1 Acrylic and gold felt on canvas 16" x 20" 2015 About me: I am a self taught artist based in New Jersey. I like experimenting with colors and different forms of art.
13b   13b 307b The Divine Intervention Acrylic on canvas 24" x 24" 2014 About me: I am a self taught artist based in New Jersey. I like experimenting with colors and different forms of art.
15   15 310 FUBAR Artist's Book: Monoprints on Rives with Serigrapy/ covers wrapped in Combat Paper 12" x 48" x 15" opened 2016 FUBAR is a collaborative artists' book by the printmaker/book artist and a e poet about war. The poem is part of a suite of sonnets written from the point of view of a female airfare physian.

This artist has been the Resident Book Artist
at the Experimental Printmaking Institute, Lafayette College
since 2001. She had residencies at Vermont Studio Center, Universidad Autonomia Metropolitano, Mexico City, Universidad Costa Rica, San Jose, the Virginia Center for Creative Arts and upcoming at the Ragdale Foundation near Chicago. Her work is in the National Museum of Women in the Arts and many special and private collections. Miller is author of Locus Mentis (PS Books 2012) and her poems and art have appeared in Wordgathering, Kaleidoscope, Dark as a Hazel Eye (Ragged Sky Press) and the Stillwater Review. She publishes hand-bound artist books through her press www.luciapress.com. She has collaborated with many artists and poets including Ross Gay and Nikky Finney.
16a   16a 311a Earth Warning: Extinct Species Specimens Acrylic and Collage on Canvas 18" x 32" 2015 This series of work has taken on an urgent direction. I printed a series of tablet like hieroglyphic linoleum cuts. They are collaged onto a canvas or print paper and compositions are built around them emphasizing a particular impact that we are having on the environment. For example, overfishing the oceans, polluting rivers, or species extinction. The titles of these works are prefaced with “Earth Warning” as if they were visual documents warning us of the impending fate of the Earth.
16b   16b 311b Earth Warning: Overfishing the Oceans Acrylic and Collage on Canvas 18" x 32" 2015 This series of work has taken on an urgent direction. I printed a series of tablet like hieroglyphic linoleum cuts. They are collaged onto a canvas or print paper and compositions are built around them emphasizing a particular impact that we are having on the environment. For example, overfishing the oceans, polluting rivers, or species extinction. The titles of these works are prefaced with “Earth Warning” as if they were visual documents warning us of the impending fate of the Earth.
17a 17a_det 17a 312a Useless Pieces (Tryptich) Repurposed Wood 103x16x20 2015 My work uses repurposed materials as an attempt to not only limit my impact on the environment, but to also aid in this belief that even discarded materials still hold great value and beauty. For this body of work I used various woods from furniture manufacturers and local frame shops. Now these pieces of scraps have been accumulated in large quantities, and have created such an imposing mass that their beauty and usefulness is something that is difficult to overlook. The pieces used are those that were once intended to be washed away, but instead have been fossilized and immortalized for years to come.

I gained my BFA at Florida State University, a path that I could have easily missed. I was orphaned as a child, and lived in various places before being adopted. A story many orphans never know. Afterwards, the feeling of worthlessness still lingered and I felt a constant struggle to find my self worth. My sculptures are the embodiment of my attempt to bring worth to the worthless. For each piece was once trash, but now they are reborn as monoliths for all to see.
17b   17b 312b Wasted Wood Repurposed Wood 23.5x23.5x33.5x23.5x3 2016 My work uses repurposed materials as an attempt to not only limit my impact on the environment, but to also aid in this belief that even discarded materials still hold great value and beauty. For this body of work I used various woods from furniture manufacturers and local frame shops. Now these pieces of scraps have been accumulated in large quantities, and have created such an imposing mass that their beauty and usefulness is something that is difficult to overlook. The pieces used are those that were once intended to be washed away, but instead have been fossilized and immortalized for years to come.

I gained my BFA at Florida State University, a path that I could have easily missed. I was orphaned as a child, and lived in various places before being adopted. A story many orphans never know. Afterwards, the feeling of worthlessness still lingered and I felt a constant struggle to find my self worth. My sculptures are the embodiment of my attempt to bring worth to the worthless. For each piece was once trash, but now they are reborn as monoliths for all to see.
18a   18a 313a WHITNEY HOUSTON Acrylic 24Hx 18W 2012 I am an Expressionist.  I try to express the inner being through color and facial expression.  I only paint a subject I can connect with in a special way.  The painting, "Desnuda Of Times Square", won the 3rd 2016 ARTSLANT PRIZE SHOWCASE.  I was most recently in the 2015 Art Alliance 29th Annual Juried Exhibition.
18b   18b 313b DESNUDA OF TIMES SQUARE Acrylic and Marker 30Hx 24W 2016 I am an Expressionist.  I try to express the inner being through color and facial expression.  I only paint a subject I can connect with in a special way.  The painting, "Desnuda Of Times Square", won the 3rd 2016 ARTSLANT PRIZE SHOWCASE.  I was most recently in the 2015 Art Alliance 29th Annual Juried Exhibition.
19a 19a_det 19a 315a Whoring Through Colorado Glazed Stoneware, Unglazed Stoneware, Plaster mixed with Paint, Metal Filler 10"x9"x6.5" 2016 Currently, I am interested in creating small and medium scale sculptures that consist of a mix of plaster, concrete, wood, metal, canvas, glass, bonding agents, and dried paint fragments. They are altered through a series of experimental processes in which the original material is altered visually, at times, beyond recognition.
Altering formal elements in each piece by reexamining textural surfaces, experimenting with spatial nuance and contrasting structural components in my works allow me to create sculptural genealogies. I am focused on examining repetitive shapes on three-dimensional forms, which at first glance appear like cast off rubble from building sites, but when examined more closely evoke visual references to tools and implements, which are particularly apparent in the smaller pieces and in forms incorporating negative space. The planar parts of a singular piece are often cannibalized from my past projects, which further masks and distorts these individual works. Finally, I take cues from my process and react to the building materials and their specific qualities.
A fusion of opposites is frequently at work in my sculptures, where objects are combined to produce a tension through combinations of gesture, color, mass and material. For example, in most recent sculptures this notion is reflected in several glazed clay pieces where I have juxtaposed high gloss surfaces with matte, sand blasted glaze. My body of work acknowledges a visual contrast between the altered components and their former histories. By attempting to question what I see as “appropriate” material usage, I invite unexpected results that allow me to define, explore, and push the structure and integration of materials in my sculptures.
19b   19b 315b Vagaries Tin, Metal Filler, Paint 6.5"x5.5"x3.5" 2015 Currently, I am interested in creating small and medium scale sculptures that consist of a mix of plaster, concrete, wood, metal, canvas, glass, bonding agents, and dried paint fragments. They are altered through a series of experimental processes in which the original material is altered visually, at times, beyond recognition.
Altering formal elements in each piece by reexamining textural surfaces, experimenting with spatial nuance and contrasting structural components in my works allow me to create sculptural genealogies. I am focused on examining repetitive shapes on three-dimensional forms, which at first glance appear like cast off rubble from building sites, but when examined more closely evoke visual references to tools and implements, which are particularly apparent in the smaller pieces and in forms incorporating negative space. The planar parts of a singular piece are often cannibalized from my past projects, which further masks and distorts these individual works. Finally, I take cues from my process and react to the building materials and their specific qualities.
A fusion of opposites is frequently at work in my sculptures, where objects are combined to produce a tension through combinations of gesture, color, mass and material. For example, in most recent sculptures this notion is reflected in several glazed clay pieces where I have juxtaposed high gloss surfaces with matte, sand blasted glaze. My body of work acknowledges a visual contrast between the altered components and their former histories. By attempting to question what I see as “appropriate” material usage, I invite unexpected results that allow me to define, explore, and push the structure and integration of materials in my sculptures.
20a   20a 317a Petit Bistro Watercolor pencil & watercolor paint 23"W 23"H x 1"D 2015 Pencils, pens, paper, paints, brushes, fabric, pins, needles, beads, threads, wire...these are the things that turn me on and make my hands happy!  A light bulb goes on in my head at the sight of these things and the process of creation begins immediately!

I've been sewing and designing since childhood. At first, it was making clothing for my dolls. Later on, I designed and made curtains, drapes and  throw pillows for my home; then, clothing for my children. In the recent past, I designed and constructed beaded jewelry and created and constructed themed candy topiary centerpieces for parties.

I especially love creating and crafting collage because of it's 3-dimensionality which allows me free-expression relating to anything and everything. Collage encompasses my love of painting & sewing and, in addition, handling favorite materials, such as beads, sequins, fabric and sparkling threads.

Drawing and watercolor paints are, likewise, another passion which allows me to express what I feel, and interpret what I feel and what I see, in a creative and individualistic manner.
20b   20b 317b Pretty Posies Watercolor Pencil 13"W 16"H x 1"D 2015 Pencils, pens, paper, paints, brushes, fabric, pins, needles, beads, threads, wire...these are the things that turn me on and make my hands happy!  A light bulb goes on in my head at the sight of these things and the process of creation begins immediately!
I've been sewing and designing since childhood. At first, it was making clothing for my dolls. Later on, I designed and made curtains, drapes and  throw pillows for my home; then, clothing for my children. In the recent past, I designed and constructed beaded jewelry and created and constructed themed candy topiary centerpieces for parties. I especially love creating and crafting collage because of it's 3-dimensionality which allows me free-expression relating to anything and everything. Collage encompasses my love of painting & sewing and, in addition, handling favorite materials, such as beads, sequins, fabric and sparkling threads.
Drawing and watercolor paints are, likewise, another passion which allows me to express what I feel, and interpret what I feel and what I see, in a creative and individualistic manner.
20c   20c 317c I Love NY Mixed-media collage: Watercolor pencil, markers, construction papers, plastic objects 30"W x 14"H x 1"D 2016 Pencils, pens, paper, paints, brushes, fabric, pins, needles, beads, threads, wire...these are the things that turn me on and make my hands happy!  A light bulb goes on in my head at the sight of these things and the process of creation begins immediately!
I've been sewing and designing since childhood. At first, it was making clothing for my dolls. Later on, I designed and made curtains, drapes and  throw pillows for my home; then, clothing for my children. In the recent past, I designed and constructed beaded jewelry and created and constructed themed candy topiary centerpieces for parties. I especially love creating and crafting collage because of it's 3-dimensionality which allows me free-expression relating to anything and everything. Collage encompasses my love of painting & sewing and, in addition, handling favorite materials, such as beads, sequins, fabric and sparkling threads.
Drawing and watercolor paints are, likewise, another passion which allows me to express what I feel, and interpret what I feel and what I see, in a creative and individualistic manner.
21a   21a 318a Laotian Falls Acrylic on canvas 40 x 30 2016 I enjoy looking at my surroundings and finding striking relationships among colors and shapes often found in nature.  Having traveled to far away places in Southeast Asia, I often use photographs from my journeys as a point of departure.  I attempt to juxtapose bold colors, textures and the play of light.  I strive to capture a mood or feeling, and I am inspired to paint  by the beauty I see in nature and my surroundings.  The qualities of line, loose and gestural brushwork are an integral part of my process.  I am drawn to the tactile feeling of paint and the creative process.  I think of painting as an invigorating dance between me and the canvas where I lose all sense of time and place.
21b   21b 318b Open Arms Acrylic on canvas 40 x 30 2016 I enjoy looking at my surroundings and finding striking relationships among colors and shapes often found in nature.  Having traveled to far away places in Southeast Asia, I often use photographs from my journeys as a point of departure.  I attempt to juxtapose bold colors, textures and the play of light.  I strive to capture a mood or feeling, and I am inspired to paint  by the beauty I see in nature and my surroundings.  The qualities of line, loose and gestural brushwork are an integral part of my process.  I am drawn to the tactile feeling of paint and the creative process.  I think of painting as an invigorating dance between me and the canvas where I lose all sense of time and place.
22a   22a 319a Bubble Bowl No. 1 Ceramics 9in. x 8 in. x 6 in. 2016 I am a Visual Artist and Art Teacher. She has dedicated her life to the process of creating art and teaching others the benefits of expression. After graduating from SUNY New Paltz with a Bachelor’s in Arts Education, she received her Masters in Arts & Cultural Management from Pratt Institute. Madison's artistic inspiration comes from the whimsy in the human experience. Her artwork reflects her attraction to pattern and the lightness of nature. She has a background in painting and printmaking and has recently expanded her talents into beaded embroidery and ceramics. She currently lives and works in the New Jersey.
22b   22b 319b Oyster Shell Ceramics 9 in. x 8 in. x 4 in. 2016 I am a Visual Artist and Art Teacher. She has dedicated her life to the process of creating art and teaching others the benefits of expression. After graduating from SUNY New Paltz with a Bachelor’s in Arts Education, she received her Masters in Arts & Cultural Management from Pratt Institute. Madison's artistic inspiration comes from the whimsy in the human experience. Her artwork reflects her attraction to pattern and the lightness of nature. She has a background in painting and printmaking and has recently expanded her talents into beaded embroidery and ceramics. She currently lives and works in the New Jersey.
24a   24a 321a Spirit of Wisdom Gouache and colored lacquer on wood fiber panel 19.7 x 27.5 2016 This Russian-born artist is the daughter of a well-known Russian artist and art teacher. Although she never studied art at school, she has been drawing since she was a child. At the age of seventeen she became engrossed by a number of subjects that deepened her spirituality. She studied psychology, neuro-linguistic programming, Eastern philosophy, esoteric science, Runology, and mysticism. Like her mother, Alena had certain psychic abilities. Following her mother’s passing in 1991, she began painting mystic paintings-talismans. Alena claims that her paintings protect peace and well-being of families that own them. As well, there have  been cases of people getting healed from serious illnesses. The paintings help to recharge energy, support and protect the owner from all that is negative, bring luck and perfect health. Each paining has its own personality and program as many contain special code words, runes, programming them for happiness and success.
"I think of it as my mission, to paint magic paintings that bring people luck, wealth, perfect health, and make their dreams come true. They make people better - more compassionate and honest."   
24b   24b 321b Heavenly Butterflies I Gouache and colored lacquer on wood fiber panel 19.7 x 19.7 2016 This Russian-born artist is the daughter of a well-known Russian artist and art teacher. Although she never studied art at school, she has been drawing since she was a child. At the age of seventeen she became engrossed by a number of subjects that deepened her spirituality. She studied psychology, neuro-linguistic programming, Eastern philosophy, esoteric science, Runology, and mysticism. Like her mother, Alena had certain psychic abilities. Following her mother’s passing in 1991, she began painting mystic paintings-talismans. Alena claims that her paintings protect peace and well-being of families that own them. As well, there have  been cases of people getting healed from serious illnesses. The paintings help to recharge energy, support and protect the owner from all that is negative, bring luck and perfect health. Each paining has its own personality and program as many contain special code words, runes, programming them for happiness and success.
"I think of it as my mission, to paint magic paintings that bring people luck, wealth, perfect health, and make their dreams come true. They make people better - more compassionate and honest."                           
25a   25a 323a Summer Altar: Earth, Wind and Fire oil/panel 6 inches x 8 inches 2016 The imagery in my work has focused on food and meaning. Food can nourish, it can be beautiful subject matter to paint, and it can act as a social messenger. Two of my main themes are food & morality and food & identity. What we eat, how we eat, and when we eat can reveal social status, religious affiliation and cultural identity. We use food rituals to mark occasions, to connect with others, and to worship.  These meanings are not inherent to food. They depend on social context and conventions.
My “Confession” series focused on the seven deadly sins as well as on shame and personal eating habits. Gluttony versus abstinence, denial and restriction describe a moral dimension to eating. Food choices can feel virtuous or guilt producing. How we grow, harvest, butcher, and process plants and animals bring up many ethical dilemmas. What we eat as it relates to our health and body image can also be moral and political minefields. Food can comfort and it plays an important role in many celebrations but it has also been used to torture, punish and poison.
In recent paintings, I have focused more broadly on rituals of religious and contemplative significance. I’m interested in how we use rituals to grapple with being human and how we create sacred spaces, both public and private, that help us to re-connect with our inner world as well as with each other. I paint from displays of sculptures, photographs, candles, foods, offering bowls and other objects chosen for their symbolic meaning, especially focusing on the their groupings in the constructed environment of personal shrines and altars.
25b   25b 323b Meditation: Busy Mind oil/panel 10 inches x 8 inches 2016 The imagery in my work has focused on food and meaning. Food can nourish, it can be beautiful subject matter to paint, and it can act as a social messenger. Two of my main themes are food & morality and food & identity. What we eat, how we eat, and when we eat can reveal social status, religious affiliation and cultural identity. We use food rituals to mark occasions, to connect with others, and to worship.  These meanings are not inherent to food. They depend on social context and conventions.
My “Confession” series focused on the seven deadly sins as well as on shame and personal eating habits. Gluttony versus abstinence, denial and restriction describe a moral dimension to eating. Food choices can feel virtuous or guilt producing. How we grow, harvest, butcher, and process plants and animals bring up many ethical dilemmas. What we eat as it relates to our health and body image can also be moral and political minefields. Food can comfort and it plays an important role in many celebrations but it has also been used to torture, punish and poison.
In recent paintings, I have focused more broadly on rituals of religious and contemplative significance. I’m interested in how we use rituals to grapple with being human and how we create sacred spaces, both public and private, that help us to re-connect with our inner world as well as with each other. I paint from displays of sculptures, photographs, candles, foods, offering bowls and other objects chosen for their symbolic meaning, especially focusing on the their groupings in the constructed environment of personal shrines and altars.
26a   26a 326a Beyond Visual Voices Mixed Media Collage 36" x 48" 2016 I feel.   And, I write what I feel. Merely write when I feel : 
I miss my high school friends who became mothers, but cannot be reached now.
My heart was beating by overhearing about my sister’s love affair on the hill.
I wanted to hug my exhausted shoulder caused by a beloved male teacher leaving.
I recalled my keenly cyan-green longings for the past. My churning mind runs away into faint foggy air. I wanted to hear my mother operating a sewing machine.Garden Zinnia became bloody dark red due to a full moon.Rain shower shake my turbulent heart.I needed courage from a fear of  life.
The utmost sincerity is feeling something exactly as it is.  Feeling is soul language.  Soul language is feeling.But, writing limits my soul language from deep inside. A soul language that cannot be inspired by limited heart Now, I reveal these inspired feelings visually. And I call those “soul essays”.They are my visual essays.
Some reflected my deep spirit with heart beating ; others  were recorded showing my broken heart with grief, and the excitement of longing.
That is, my images are not a mirror nor merely a form of artistic expression.
Rather, these images represent the consolation, inspiration and rediscovery of my past, present and future.  These visual essays are all-encompassing portrayals of my state of mind and heart……
26b   26b 327a Going Out oil on canvas 24" x 36" 2016 "I try to tell a story through my paintings. Not always a fantastic or exciting story, but one that is true and relatable."I feel.   And, I write what I feel. Merely write when I feel : 
I miss my high school friends who became mothers, but cannot be reached now.
My heart was beating by overhearing about my sister’s love affair on the hill.
I wanted to hug my exhausted shoulder caused by a beloved male teacher leaving.
I recalled my keenly cyan-green longings for the past. My churning mind runs away into faint foggy air. I wanted to hear my mother operating a sewing machine.Garden Zinnia became bloody dark red due to a full moon.Rain shower shake my turbulent heart.I needed courage from a fear of  life.
The utmost sincerity is feeling something exactly as it is.  Feeling is soul language.  Soul language is feeling.But, writing limits my soul language from deep inside. A soul language that cannot be inspired by limited heart Now, I reveal these inspired feelings visually. And I call those “soul essays”.They are my visual essays.
Some reflected my deep spirit with heart beating ; others  were recorded showing my broken heart with grief, and the excitement of longing.
That is, my images are not a mirror nor merely a form of artistic expression.
Rather, these images represent the consolation, inspiration and rediscovery of my past, present and future.  These visual essays are all-encompassing portrayals of my state of mind and heart……
26c   26c 327 Waiting For Coffee oil on canvas 16" x 20" 2016 I feel.   And, I write what I feel. Merely write when I feel : 
I miss my high school friends who became mothers, but cannot be reached now.
My heart was beating by overhearing about my sister’s love affair on the hill.
I wanted to hug my exhausted shoulder caused by a beloved male teacher leaving.
I recalled my keenly cyan-green longings for the past. My churning mind runs away into faint foggy air. I wanted to hear my mother operating a sewing machine.Garden Zinnia became bloody dark red due to a full moon.Rain shower shake my turbulent heart.I needed courage from a fear of  life.

The utmost sincerity is feeling something exactly as it is.  Feeling is soul language.  Soul language is feeling.But, writing limits my soul language from deep inside. A soul language that cannot be inspired by limited heart Now, I reveal these inspired feelings visually. And I call those “soul essays”.They are my visual essays.

Some reflected my deep spirit with heart beating ; others  were recorded showing my broken heart with grief, and the excitement of longing.
That is, my images are not a mirror nor merely a form of artistic expression.
Rather, these images represent the consolation, inspiration and rediscovery of my past, present and future.  These visual essays are all-encompassing portrayals of my state of mind and heart……
26d   26d 330a The Red Jar Acrylic 50x40 cm 2016 I feel.   And, I write what I feel. Merely write when I feel : 
I miss my high school friends who became mothers, but cannot be reached now.
My heart was beating by overhearing about my sister’s love affair on the hill.
I wanted to hug my exhausted shoulder caused by a beloved male teacher leaving.
I recalled my keenly cyan-green longings for the past. My churning mind runs away into faint foggy air. I wanted to hear my mother operating a sewing machine.Garden Zinnia became bloody dark red due to a full moon.Rain shower shake my turbulent heart.I needed courage from a fear of  life.

The utmost sincerity is feeling something exactly as it is.  Feeling is soul language.  Soul language is feeling.But, writing limits my soul language from deep inside. A soul language that cannot be inspired by limited heart Now, I reveal these inspired feelings visually. And I call those “soul essays”.They are my visual essays.

Some reflected my deep spirit with heart beating ; others  were recorded showing my broken heart with grief, and the excitement of longing.
That is, my images are not a mirror nor merely a form of artistic expression.
Rather, these images represent the consolation, inspiration and rediscovery of my past, present and future.  These visual essays are all-encompassing portrayals of my state of mind and heart……
27a   27a 327a Going Out oil on canvas 24" x 36" 2016 "I try to tell a story through my paintings. Not always a fantastic or exciting story, but one that is true and relatable."
27b   27b 327b Waiting For Coffee oil on canvas 16" x 20" 2016 "I try to tell a story through my paintings. Not always a fantastic or exciting story, but one that is true and relatable."
28a   28a 330a The Red Jar Acrylic 50x40 cm 2016 I am born in Venezuela and lived surrounded by the arts to be in the capital city of the state of which are oriuendos visual artists and teachers Alejandro Otero and Jesús Rafael Soto, for fifteen years I have worked as a radio announcer, where I presented my criticism against governments local and national maltreated the people, that made me to earn enemies to the point that I should stop keep doing my work to prevent attacks, that led me to devote myself to painting, where I have four years trying to use it as a voice of expression a country that calls for more social justice and that tells the world that a self-proclaimed socialist revolutionary government has led to a nation with inexhaustible resources to the brink of civil war and misery ...
28b   28b 330b Eunucos Acrylic 78x42 cm 2016 I am born in Venezuela and lived surrounded by the arts to be in the capital city of the state of which are oriuendos visual artists and teachers Alejandro Otero and Jesús Rafael Soto, for fifteen years I have worked as a radio announcer, where I presented my criticism against governments local and national maltreated the people, that made me to earn enemies to the point that I should stop keep doing my work to prevent attacks, that led me to devote myself to painting, where I have four years trying to use it as a voice of expression a country that calls for more social justice and that tells the world that a self-proclaimed socialist revolutionary government has led to a nation with inexhaustible resources to the brink of civil war and misery ...
29a   29a 332a The sound o' my voice/hu Mixed media - printed paper, wood, textile, glass 19" X 23" 2016 This artist has been influence by several artists, but found her voice through her love of the work of Hieronymous Bosch, Marcel Duchamp, Jean Arp, Paul Klee, Louise Bourgeois, Roger Brown, Alex Grey, Charles Burchfield and Viola Frey. She is partial to Fringe/Folk/Outside Art, the Chicago Imagists and LA Underground Alternative Pop Surrealists. She draws inspiration from feminist readings of Carl G. Jung and world mythologies.
29b 29b_d 29b 332b Death Plug 2000 ceramic, glass, paper 14"x12"x12" 2016
This artist has been influence by several artists, but found her voice through her love of the work of Hieronymous Bosch, Marcel Duchamp, Jean Arp, Paul Klee, Louise Bourgeois, Roger Brown, Alex Grey, Charles Burchfield and Viola Frey. She is partial to Fringe/Folk/Outside Art, the Chicago Imagists and LA Underground Alternative Pop Surrealists. She draws inspiration from feminist readings of Carl G. Jung and world mythologies.
29c 29c-d 29c 332c Homeland Insecurity System original cast resin sculpted forms,wood, fabric, plastic, working electronics and found objects 17" x 27" x 9" 2016 This artist has been influence by several artists, but found her voice through her love of the work of Hieronymous Bosch, Marcel Duchamp, Jean Arp, Paul Klee, Louise Bourgeois, Roger Brown, Alex Grey, Charles Burchfield and Viola Frey. She is partial to Fringe/Folk/Outside Art, the Chicago Imagists and LA Underground Alternative Pop Surrealists. She draws inspiration from feminist readings of Carl G. Jung and world mythologies.
29d 29d-det 29d 332d S/He who rises/Cumulonimbus/Shu ceramic,original cast resin, wood, textile, stone and glass 36"x 18"x18" 2016 This artist has been influence by several artists, but found her voice through her love of the work of Hieronymous Bosch, Marcel Duchamp, Jean Arp, Paul Klee, Louise Bourgeois, Roger Brown, Alex Grey, Charles Burchfield and Viola Frey. She is partial to Fringe/Folk/Outside Art, the Chicago Imagists and LA Underground Alternative Pop Surrealists. She draws inspiration from feminist readings of Carl G. Jung and world mythologies.
30a   30a 334a The Woodworker Watercolor 33"x19" 2015  
30b   30b 334b The Street Musician Watercolor 33"x19" 2016  
31a   31a 336a Destination Acrylic on Gessobord 12 x 16 inches 2016 My paintings are derived the memory of a place rather than a fixation on the reality of it.  The simplification of the structures generates this uncertainty. The work seeks to find solidity in what is fleeting, and yet is not at all. If one was not seated on a train, or looking out the window of a car they could explore and discover these places in new lights, from new perspectives, but when one is limited by the routine of a journey taken time and time again they begin to find fascination with what is the same. It could be the way the light captures a factory in the morning versus the afternoon, or a glass building transforms as you pass by. These small changes noticed only for a few seconds before they disappear leave lasting impressions. And by associating these impressions with the “destinations” of the journey the trivialities that become so important become intertwined with the subject of my own memory, and calling for solidification in my paintings.
31b   31b 336b Avenue Acrylic on Panel 6 x 6 inches 2016 My paintings are derived the memory of a place rather than a fixation on the reality of it.  The simplification of the structures generates this uncertainty. The work seeks to find solidity in what is fleeting, and yet is not at all. If one was not seated on a train, or looking out the window of a car they could explore and discover these places in new lights, from new perspectives, but when one is limited by the routine of a journey taken time and time again they begin to find fascination with what is the same. It could be the way the light captures a factory in the morning versus the afternoon, or a glass building transforms as you pass by. These small changes noticed only for a few seconds before they disappear leave lasting impressions. And by associating these impressions with the “destinations” of the journey the trivialities that become so important become intertwined with the subject of my own memory, and calling for solidification in my paintings.
32a   32a 337a TrueBlue Acrylic on Canvas 36x24 2011  
32b   32b 337b Sprinnakers Acrylic on Canvas 40x16 2011  
33a   33a 338a Meltwater Acrylic on Canvas Wrapped Panel 35" Round 2015 This Artist was raised in New Orleans in a house full of art and artists. His earliest creative influences were his mother Janeth Murray and aunt Lynne Gleason – both successful artists. Part of the creative gumbo was his grandmother Sculptor Rai Murray. A music filled studio, the smell of fresh paint and piles of paintings to name are fond memories of the time at home.
For five years Brian split his time between New Orleans and San Francisco. After a few years in the city he moved to the eclectic houseboat community in Sausalito. He now lives with his wife in Marin County and is grateful to have more time in the studio.
33b   33b 338b Pontchartrain Acrylic on Canvas Wrapped Panel 22" Round 2015 This Artist was raised in New Orleans in a house full of art and artists. His earliest creative influences were his mother Janeth Murray and aunt Lynne Gleason – both successful artists. Part of the creative gumbo was his grandmother Sculptor Rai Murray. A music filled studio, the smell of fresh paint and piles of paintings to name are fond memories of the time at home.
For five years Brian split his time between New Orleans and San Francisco. After a few years in the city he moved to the eclectic houseboat community in Sausalito. He now lives with his wife in Marin County and is grateful to have more time in the studio.
33c   33c 338c Helitrope Acrylic on Canvas Wrapped Panel 48" x 48" 2016 This Artist was raised in New Orleans in a house full of art and artists. His earliest creative influences were his mother Janeth Murray and aunt Lynne Gleason – both successful artists. Part of the creative gumbo was his grandmother Sculptor Rai Murray. A music filled studio, the smell of fresh paint and piles of paintings to name are fond memories of the time at home.
For five years Brian split his time between New Orleans and San Francisco. After a few years in the city he moved to the eclectic houseboat community in Sausalito. He now lives with his wife in Marin County and is grateful to have more time in the studio.
34a   34a 339a Waiting... Acrylic on Canvas 36x48 inches 2015  
34b   34b 339b Eames Chair/Ivory Couch Acrylic on Canvas 30x40 inches 2012  
35   35 341 Eckman_David_1.jpeg Acrylic 30"x40" 2015 I have always enjoyed the opportunity to express my perspective through the visual arts.  My primary approach mostly consists of the energy the subject matter possess or projects. This is captured through vivid color with dynamic composition to brand my own expressive style. 


To create  "Crazy Colorful Soul Strokes" with a vibrant application that speaks from an individual perspective, while connecting on a common plane to the diversity within the public.


36a   36a 342a Korn Take 1 Acrylic Paint on Canvas 43 x 43 2014  
36b   36b 342b Genau Acrylic Paint on Canvas 31.5 x 43 2015  
36c   36c 342c Es war einmal Acrylic Paint on Canvas 35 x 35 2015  
36d   36d 342d Once Acrylic Paint on Canvas 18 x 18 2014  
37a   37a 343a Hudson Yards Construction Jan 1, 2016 Photography-Silver Gelatin Print 16 x 20 Framed 2016 Ron Brown is a fine arts photographer and darkroom printer.  He uses film, works on diverse subjects and employs various techniques including infrared, toning and high contrast and low key printing.  Ron has had 12 solo shows, been in numerous group shows and has received recognition and awards for his photography.
37b   37b 343b Garden State Paper Company Photography-Silver Gelatin Print 16 x 20 2015 Ron Brown is a fine arts photographer and darkroom printer.  He uses film, works on diverse subjects and employs various techniques including infrared, toning and high contrast and low key printing.  Ron has had 12 solo shows, been in numerous group shows and has received recognition and awards for his photography.
38a   38a 344a Luminous Light of Lakshmi Acrylic 48x36 2016  
38b   38b 344b Blinded by the Light Photograph 29x25 2016  
39a   39a 345a Branchbrook Park Acrylic Painting 48" x 48" 2012  
39b   39b 345b Beach Girl Acrylic Painting 36" x 48" 2015  
40a   40a 346a Who Am I To Be Blind Oil on  Canvas 24 x 36 2014  
40b   40b 346b Calle Reconquista Monopront 19 x 26 2015  
41a   41a 347a Autumn Journey Acrylic 20x16 2016  
41b   41b 347b Serene Impressions Acrylic 17x14 2016  
42a   42a 348a Dark Beauty acrylic on canvas 12 x 12 2013 My creative practice is an ongoing exploration of fundamentals – line, color, and form – using mixed media in an increasingly social context. Over the years I have gravitated towards books  and cards, especially artist trading cards, supplementing a more traditional practice of working on stand-alone paper or canvas. 
While I do most of my work in my studio, I also work while commuting by train between Princeton and Manhattan; making art on the train is what initially encouraged me to think and work smaller.
My interactions with other artists, especially through social media, have confirmed my inclination to make art within community rather than as a strictly solo artist. Even as I love to share in shows (especially group shows) I see my work as part of broader efforts to enhance creativity, connection, social justice, and well-being in community.
42b   42b 348b Holding mixed media on canvas 12 x 12 2013 My creative practice is an ongoing exploration of fundamentals – line, color, and form – using mixed media in an increasingly social context. Over the years I have gravitated towards books  and cards, especially artist trading cards, supplementing a more traditional practice of working on stand-alone paper or canvas. 
While I do most of my work in my studio, I also work while commuting by train between Princeton and Manhattan; making art on the train is what initially encouraged me to think and work smaller.
My interactions with other artists, especially through social media, have confirmed my inclination to make art within community rather than as a strictly solo artist. Even as I love to share in shows (especially group shows) I see my work as part of broader efforts to enhance creativity, connection, social justice, and well-being in community.

42c   42c 348c Womb acrylic & ink on canvas 12 x 12 2015 My creative practice is an ongoing exploration of fundamentals – line, color, and form – using mixed media in an increasingly social context. Over the years I have gravitated towards books  and cards, especially artist trading cards, supplementing a more traditional practice of working on stand-alone paper or canvas. 
While I do most of my work in my studio, I also work while commuting by train between Princeton and Manhattan; making art on the train is what initially encouraged me to think and work smaller.
My interactions with other artists, especially through social media, have confirmed my inclination to make art within community rather than as a strictly solo artist. Even as I love to share in shows (especially group shows) I see my work as part of broader efforts to enhance creativity, connection, social justice, and well-being in community.
42d   42d 348d Ladder on Green mixed media on canvas 9 x 12 2013 My creative practice is an ongoing exploration of fundamentals – line, color, and form – using mixed media in an increasingly social context. Over the years I have gravitated towards books  and cards, especially artist trading cards, supplementing a more traditional practice of working on stand-alone paper or canvas. 
While I do most of my work in my studio, I also work while commuting by train between Princeton and Manhattan; making art on the train is what initially encouraged me to think and work smaller.
My interactions with other artists, especially through social media, have confirmed my inclination to make art within community rather than as a strictly solo artist. Even as I love to share in shows (especially group shows) I see my work as part of broader efforts to enhance creativity, connection, social justice, and well-being in community.

43a   43a 350a Vipasana Acrylic and ink on canvas 16 x 20 2016 I am a New Jersey based artist intensely inspired by the art from my birthplace, Mithila paintings or as popularly known Madhubani paintings an ancient folk art from India.  I took up the art form at an early age observing my mother make them for various occasions, rituals and festivals. Over the years I have evolved my own distinct style by fusing the contemporary ideas with traditional art form using modern tools.
43b   43b 350b Rangnritya Acrylic and ink on canvas 16 x 20 2016 I am a New Jersey based artist intensely inspired by the art from my birthplace, Mithila paintings or as popularly known Madhubani paintings an ancient folk art from India.  I took up the art form at an early age observing my mother make them for various occasions, rituals and festivals. Over the years I have evolved my own distinct style by fusing the contemporary ideas with traditional art form using modern tools.
44a   44a 351a Falling Bethlehem Paper, Glass, Acrylic on Board 12x16 2015 It was while recently working on an outdoor mosaic glass sculpture project that my interest in cut glass inspired me to experiment with combining my painting and digital skills with cut and broken glass, thus creating a different, exciting new look of color and texture. 
At the same time I became interested specifically in abandoned steel and glass factories, realizing the loss of jobs as these factories were left to decay while many jobs were sent overseas. Being from Pennsylvania I understood the problems and hardships of the industrial working class. My goal is to depict the destruction of these industries of steel, glass and coal. It was while photographing the Bethlehem Steel Plant that I began to see the possibilities of being able to create a a series of visual concepts of this once-great American industry's resurrection. The first image, "Falling Bethlehem" was inspired by Bethlehem Steel. In "Nicholas and the Breaker Boys" the coal miner is actually my grandfather and depicts mining hardships and child labor early in 20th century Pennsylvania.
44b   44b 351b Nicholas and the Breaker Boys Acrylic, Mixed Media on Board 16x20 2016 It was while recently working on an outdoor mosaic glass sculpture project that my interest in cut glass inspired me to experiment with combining my painting and digital skills with cut and broken glass, thus creating a different, exciting new look of color and texture. 
At the same time I became interested specifically in abandoned steel and glass factories, realizing the loss of jobs as these factories were left to decay while many jobs were sent overseas. Being from Pennsylvania I understood the problems and hardships of the industrial working class. My goal is to depict the destruction of these industries of steel, glass and coal. It was while photographing the Bethlehem Steel Plant that I began to see the possibilities of being able to create a a series of visual concepts of this once-great American industry's resurrection. The first image, "Falling Bethlehem" was inspired by Bethlehem Steel. In "Nicholas and the Breaker Boys" the coal miner is actually my grandfather and depicts mining hardships and child labor early in 20th century Pennsylvania.
45a   45a 352a The Branding of the Minotaur multimedia sculpture (coldworked glass mug, glass beads, clay, bronze, glue, paint) 6 x 7 x 4 in 2014 3D Artist Bill Clune has said, “His art is rich with historical, mythological, and symbolic connections. He’s creating something new. The objects he makes change the point of view from which we see the world.”
He started doing art inspired by science in the 1970s after drawing things under microscopes in a college botany class. After being a member of the realist Corning Painters Group in the late 1980s and early 1990s, he began a series of relief paintings that included collaged found objects, inspired by microscope images as well as the assemblages of Robert Rauschenberg. This series evolved into multimedia sculpture, with glass becoming an element in some of the works in the 2010s.
A longtime interest in anthropology and archeology has led to the current focus of hiss work, the development of human consciousness: how our ways of thinking and communicating got to where they are now and how we might want to develop in the future. Currently he is exploring symbols and other forms of graphic communication in rock art, especially those of Ice Age Europe and the “picture writing” of various Native American cultures. Townsley is now inventing a graphic language based on symbols and principles from these cultures, with the addition of symbols from contemporary road signs.
His research into anthropology and archeology has been extensive enough that he has become an artscientist. He has recently launched the website Lithic Age Art & Design Research (www.lithicage.net).
45b   45b 352b A Brief History of African Dance (from Thebes to Agape) fired paint on coldworked glass mug 2.75 x 3.75 x 3.75 in 2014 3D Artist Bill Clune has said, “His art is rich with historical, mythological, and symbolic connections. He’s creating something new. The objects he makes change the point of view from which we see the world.”
He started doing art inspired by science in the 1970s after drawing things under microscopes in a college botany class. After being a member of the realist Corning Painters Group in the late 1980s and early 1990s, he began a series of relief paintings that included collaged found objects, inspired by microscope images as well as the assemblages of Robert Rauschenberg. This series evolved into multimedia sculpture, with glass becoming an element in some of the works in the 2010s.
A longtime interest in anthropology and archeology has led to the current focus of hiss work, the development of human consciousness: how our ways of thinking and communicating got to where they are now and how we might want to develop in the future. Currently he is exploring symbols and other forms of graphic communication in rock art, especially those of Ice Age Europe and the “picture writing” of various Native American cultures. Townsley is now inventing a graphic language based on symbols and principles from these cultures, with the addition of symbols from contemporary road signs.
His research into anthropology and archeology has been extensive enough that he has become an artscientist. He has recently launched the website Lithic Age Art & Design Research (www.lithicage.net).
46a   46a 354a Round About venetian plaster, universal tints, graphite, iridescent gold oil paintstick 16" x 16" x 2" 2015 I am a painter who loves the element of surprise—the happy accident, the bold gesture, the experimental, the destruction which leads to beauty—the process! I am filled with anticipation about how the work will unfold. It is a mystery waiting to be revealed to me and to be discovered by the viewer. Concerns in my artworks spring from bits and pieces from my memories, life events, family mementos, travel, and above all, music. While listening to the music of Puccini I am transported. If I can’t sing it, I will paint it.
Abstract painting provides the freedom I need to express my internal emotions through color and texture. I paint primarily with acrylic and acrylic mediums, and in recent years have been experimenting with other media. At present, I am working with Venetian plaster. Its unique quality helps me produce surfaces that are immediately appealing and sensuous as a beautiful aria. My process includes creating colors by mixing universal tints or acrylic paints into the white plaster. I apply layers of color, then scrape, erase, rub, and sand through the surface to uncover buried marks and textures that create a history of where I have been. A variety of tools are used to create unique marks and patterns as I make decisions and take advantage of the unexpected. Although the texture on my artwork appears to be raised, it is actually hand sanded to achieve a smooth, stone-like finish. Each work pushes the direction of the next until I have exhausted the possibilities. I think Edward Hopper got it right when he said, “If I could say it in words there would be no need to paint.” For me, it’s as simple as that.
46b   46b 354b Exposed venetian plaster, universal tints, graphite 16" x 16" x 2" 2015 Art Statement I am a painter who loves the element of surprise—the happy accident, the bold gesture, the experimental, the destruction which leads to beauty—the process! I am filled with anticipation about how the work will unfold. It is a mystery waiting to be revealed to me and to be discovered by the viewer. Concerns in my artworks spring from bits and pieces from my memories, life events, family mementos, travel, and above all, music. While listening to the music of Puccini I am transported. If I can’t sing it, I will paint it.
Abstract painting provides the freedom I need to express my internal emotions through color and texture. I paint primarily with acrylic and acrylic mediums, and in recent years have been experimenting with other media. At present, I am working with Venetian plaster. Its unique quality helps me produce surfaces that are immediately appealing and sensuous as a beautiful aria. My process includes creating colors by mixing universal tints or acrylic paints into the white plaster. I apply layers of color, then scrape, erase, rub, and sand through the surface to uncover buried marks and textures that create a history of where I have been. A variety of tools are used to create unique marks and patterns as I make decisions and take advantage of the unexpected. Although the texture on my artwork appears to be raised, it is actually hand sanded to achieve a smooth, stone-like finish. Each work pushes the direction of the next until I have exhausted the possibilities. I think Edward Hopper got it right when he said, “If I could say it in words there would be no need to paint.” For me, it’s as simple as that.
47a   47a 355a Veil Photogravure on Mulberry Chine-collé 10 x 18 2016 My prints provide a glimpse into obscure elements of organic matter.  The use of gold leaf and multiple exposures create a visual alchemy.  My focus is on textures in nature and highlighting unseen areas with the use of close up photography and alternate perspectives.  Combining multiple images into one produces a dream-like quality in the works. 
Photogravure was developed during the birth of photography.  It’s pioneers were searching for a way to permanently affix images of the natural world onto paper.  The ability to print fine details with a broad, smooth tonal range is what attracts me to the process.  The documentation of nature in my work displays parallel characteristics with the pioneers of the medium.  While we both look at nature, my prints examine it’s elements deeper and attempt to uncover the hidden beauty that is often overlooked.  Nature has many complexities because of it’s complicated structures with organized elements.  My intent is to highlight a portion of these elements while invoking emotion.  Instead of viewing the whole form, my focus is on soft curves, negative space, and detailed textures of these structures.  My New Orleans environment also shines through my prints.  The dark, out of focus portions of my work are redolent of the swampy characteristics of the city.
My background as a jeweler led me to the concept of including gold leaf to the prints.  The choice to use gold leaf was more about lighting rather than the use of the material itself.  In the Georgian period, gemstones were set with closed backs.  The jeweler would position a layer of gold foil behind the stone to create a glowing effect when the jewelry hit candlelight.  I wanted to create this same glowing effect to my prints.
My prints are a result of a collaboration with nature by revealing some of its’ complexities and creating new ones.
47b   47b 355b Yen Photogravure on Gampi Chine-collé, gold leaf 26 x 30 2016 My prints provide a glimpse into obscure elements of organic matter.  The use of gold leaf and multiple exposures create a visual alchemy.  My focus is on textures in nature and highlighting unseen areas with the use of close up photography and alternate perspectives.  Combining multiple images into one produces a dream-like quality in the works. 
Photogravure was developed during the birth of photography.  It’s pioneers were searching for a way to permanently affix images of the natural world onto paper.  The ability to print fine details with a broad, smooth tonal range is what attracts me to the process.  The documentation of nature in my work displays parallel characteristics with the pioneers of the medium.  While we both look at nature, my prints examine it’s elements deeper and attempt to uncover the hidden beauty that is often overlooked.  Nature has many complexities because of it’s complicated structures with organized elements.  My intent is to highlight a portion of these elements while invoking emotion.  Instead of viewing the whole form, my focus is on soft curves, negative space, and detailed textures of these structures.  My New Orleans environment also shines through my prints.  The dark, out of focus portions of my work are redolent of the swampy characteristics of the city.
My background as a jeweler led me to the concept of including gold leaf to the prints.  The choice to use gold leaf was more about lighting rather than the use of the material itself.  In the Georgian period, gemstones were set with closed backs.  The jeweler would position a layer of gold foil behind the stone to create a glowing effect when the jewelry hit candlelight.  I wanted to create this same glowing effect to my prints.
My prints are a result of a collaboration with nature by revealing some of its’ complexities and creating new ones.
47c   47c 355c Rachis Photogravure on Mulberry Chine-collé 10 x 18 2016 My prints provide a glimpse into obscure elements of organic matter.  The use of gold leaf and multiple exposures create a visual alchemy.  My focus is on textures in nature and highlighting unseen areas with the use of close up photography and alternate perspectives.  Combining multiple images into one produces a dream-like quality in the works. 
Photogravure was developed during the birth of photography.  It’s pioneers were searching for a way to permanently affix images of the natural world onto paper.  The ability to print fine details with a broad, smooth tonal range is what attracts me to the process.  The documentation of nature in my work displays parallel characteristics with the pioneers of the medium.  While we both look at nature, my prints examine it’s elements deeper and attempt to uncover the hidden beauty that is often overlooked.  Nature has many complexities because of it’s complicated structures with organized elements.  My intent is to highlight a portion of these elements while invoking emotion.  Instead of viewing the whole form, my focus is on soft curves, negative space, and detailed textures of these structures.  My New Orleans environment also shines through my prints.  The dark, out of focus portions of my work are redolent of the swampy characteristics of the city.
My background as a jeweler led me to the concept of including gold leaf to the prints.  The choice to use gold leaf was more about lighting rather than the use of the material itself.  In the Georgian period, gemstones were set with closed backs.  The jeweler would position a layer of gold foil behind the stone to create a glowing effect when the jewelry hit candlelight.  I wanted to create this same glowing effect to my prints.
My prints are a result of a collaboration with nature by revealing some of its’ complexities and creating new ones.

48a

 

  48a 356a A Different Point of View photography/montage 20x16  2015 The current direction of my work is primarily photography montage (the technique of producing a new composite whole from fragments of photographs). I've always been a collector at heart,  so my photography naturally evolved from concentrating on a single composition in the camera as the end product,  to capturing images of anything that intrigued me for later use in a montage.  Antique and vintage objects that have had previous lives are elements I collect that eventually find their way into my work. It's difficult to predict what will be a starting point for a new piece;  a landscape with an unusual tree, a mysterious abandoned building, or the haunting eyes peering from a vintage portrait. Once I have a starting point, I begin to bring  components together piece by piece digitally in Photoshop until I'm satisfied with the composition. From there, I experiment with multiple filters, tones, colors and textures until the final piece is as close as possible to the original idea in my mind's eye. "The true locus of creativity is not the genetic process prior to the work but the work itself as it lives in the experience of the beholder."  - Monroe Beardsley, philosopher of art

48b

 

  48b 356b The Edge of Seventeen photography/montage 20x17 2016 The current direction of my work is primarily photography montage (the technique of producing a new composite whole from fragments of photographs). I've always been a collector at heart,  so my photography naturally evolved from concentrating on a single composition in the camera as the end product,  to capturing images of anything that intrigued me for later use in a montage.  Antique and vintage objects that have had previous lives are elements I collect that eventually find their way into my work. It's difficult to predict what will be a starting point for a new piece;  a landscape with an unusual tree, a mysterious abandoned building, or the haunting eyes peering from a vintage portrait. Once I have a starting point, I begin to bring  components together piece by piece digitally in Photoshop until I'm satisfied with the composition. From there, I experiment with multiple filters, tones, colors and textures until the final piece is as close as possible to the original idea in my mind's eye. "The true locus of creativity is not the genetic process prior to the work but the work itself as it lives in the experience of the beholder."  - Monroe Beardsley, philosopher of art
49a   49a 357a Street Art: Observation 1 Acrylic/Mixed Media 19" X 21" 2016 There is the perceivable world, one that we agree upon and feel comfortable with. For me this world of every day familiarity when applied to visual art binds us to a status quo that limits intellectual inquiry.
Being immersed day in and day out with the cultural imagery of the world, which for the most part is art in itself, I feel no wish to reestablish or reinterpret its function. Each of us on some level do this automatically.  
In my work I avoid the recognizable imagery that ties me to my waking consciousness. I peel back the skin of the visible and arrange the underlying structure in an attempt to connect myself to my base motives for making art. I use materials that have no formal expression beyond the basics of shape, line and color and assemble them according to various visual and physical characteristics.
The titles assigned to my work are not boundaries but suggested entries to my thought process.
49b   49b 357b Mechanism II Collage 19" X 20" 2016 There is the perceivable world, one that we agree upon and feel comfortable with. For me this world of every day familiarity when applied to visual art binds us to a status quo that limits intellectual inquiry.
Being immersed day in and day out with the cultural imagery of the world, which for the most part is art in itself, I feel no wish to reestablish or reinterpret its function. Each of us on some level do this automatically.  
In my work I avoid the recognizable imagery that ties me to my waking consciousness. I peel back the skin of the visible and arrange the underlying structure in an attempt to connect myself to my base motives for making art. I use materials that have no formal expression beyond the basics of shape, line and color and assemble them according to various visual and physical characteristics.
The titles assigned to my work are not boundaries but suggested entries to my thought process.

50a   50a 359a Present Memory acrylic, paper, glass, ribbon and plastic figure on canvas 30" H x 24" W x 1-1/2" D 2016 I've recently started to view my work, overall, as a series of fleeting solutions to an ever-morphing puzzle. Here, I will describe each of my entries individually.
Beginning with Present Memory - a somewhat ephemeral gift to myself, of restraint, of organization, and insight. The gray bow has come to represent guilt for me, because I purchased it at a party supply store.  Surprisingly, they had what I wanted, but because it was new, I later felt it a bit wasteful to use it.  The paper flower, too, though I painted that one. I kept them both in, because changing the situation would have thrown the whole piece off balance.  So guilt remains - is even reinforced, since now it seems a silly overreaction.  The painted seagull is based upon a photo I took from my parents' pier on the Magothy River near the Chesapeake Bay.  Like me, it's a scavenger.  Other birds are there for the tones, as support.  The one waiting on top is a spirit.  The rainbow's apex is an imagined microscopic view of one.  The pier, trod upon by glow-in-the-dark slippers, leads to a vaguely recalled festivity, or maybe a fantasy.  In the center, a girl gradually fades, sketched in acrylic from a mid-20th century yearbook photo, becoming a phantom.  The round gray glass element, I sliced, then kiln slumped, its understated shine mediating between the generally light-absorbent matte surfaces of the piece, and the glittering, reflective line of sequins.
My next submission, Yawn - an empathetic reflex.
I very much enjoy creating minimalistic assemblages.
(Though Present Memory and Yawn are not a diptych in the sense of having been designed to be juxtaposed, they are certainly paired in an energetic way. Optimally, they would be allowed to hang as a couple).
My third piece, How Low - working, again, within a square of several inches, an exploration of balance, layers, and line.  A language unknown to me, further obscured with washes of acrylic and other bits of ephemera. A cavernous, warm-hued form I return to from time to time looms above the measured dimensions of a submissive, almost prayerful, anonymous figure.
50b   50b 359b Yawn clay, watercolor and teabag on wood 8" H x 5-1/4 W x 3" D 2016 I've recently started to view my work, overall, as a series of fleeting solutions to an ever-morphing puzzle. Here, I will describe each of my entries individually.
Beginning with Present Memory - a somewhat ephemeral gift to myself, of restraint, of organization, and insight. The gray bow has come to represent guilt for me, because I purchased it at a party supply store.  Surprisingly, they had what I wanted, but because it was new, I later felt it a bit wasteful to use it.  The paper flower, too, though I painted that one. I kept them both in, because changing the situation would have thrown the whole piece off balance.  So guilt remains - is even reinforced, since now it seems a silly overreaction.  The painted seagull is based upon a photo I took from my parents' pier on the Magothy River near the Chesapeake Bay.  Like me, it's a scavenger.  Other birds are there for the tones, as support.  The one waiting on top is a spirit.  The rainbow's apex is an imagined microscopic view of one.  The pier, trod upon by glow-in-the-dark slippers, leads to a vaguely recalled festivity, or maybe a fantasy.  In the center, a girl gradually fades, sketched in acrylic from a mid-20th century yearbook photo, becoming a phantom.  The round gray glass element, I sliced, then kiln slumped, its understated shine mediating between the generally light-absorbent matte surfaces of the piece, and the glittering, reflective line of sequins.
My next submission, Yawn - an empathetic reflex.
I very much enjoy creating minimalistic assemblages.
(Though Present Memory and Yawn are not a diptych in the sense of having been designed to be juxtaposed, they are certainly paired in an energetic way. Optimally, they would be allowed to hang as a couple).
My third piece, How Low - working, again, within a square of several inches, an exploration of balance, layers, and line.  A language unknown to me, further obscured with washes of acrylic and other bits of ephemera. A cavernous, warm-hued form I return to from time to time looms above the measured dimensions of a submissive, almost prayerful, anonymous figure.
50c   50c 359c How Low acrylic, pastel, pen, paper and plastic on canvas 6" H x 6" W x 1-1/2"D 2015 I've recently started to view my work, overall, as a series of fleeting solutions to an ever-morphing puzzle. Here, I will describe each of my entries individually.
Beginning with Present Memory - a somewhat ephemeral gift to myself, of restraint, of organization, and insight. The gray bow has come to represent guilt for me, because I purchased it at a party supply store.  Surprisingly, they had what I wanted, but because it was new, I later felt it a bit wasteful to use it.  The paper flower, too, though I painted that one. I kept them both in, because changing the situation would have thrown the whole piece off balance.  So guilt remains - is even reinforced, since now it seems a silly overreaction.  The painted seagull is based upon a photo I took from my parents' pier on the Magothy River near the Chesapeake Bay.  Like me, it's a scavenger.  Other birds are there for the tones, as support.  The one waiting on top is a spirit.  The rainbow's apex is an imagined microscopic view of one.  The pier, trod upon by glow-in-the-dark slippers, leads to a vaguely recalled festivity, or maybe a fantasy.  In the center, a girl gradually fades, sketched in acrylic from a mid-20th century yearbook photo, becoming a phantom.  The round gray glass element, I sliced, then kiln slumped, its understated shine mediating between the generally light-absorbent matte surfaces of the piece, and the glittering, reflective line of sequins.
My next submission, Yawn - an empathetic reflex.
I very much enjoy creating minimalistic assemblages.
(Though Present Memory and Yawn are not a diptych in the sense of having been designed to be juxtaposed, they are certainly paired in an energetic way. Optimally, they would be allowed to hang as a couple).
My third piece, How Low - working, again, within a square of several inches, an exploration of balance, layers, and line.  A language unknown to me, further obscured with washes of acrylic and other bits of ephemera. A cavernous, warm-hued form I return to from time to time looms above the measured dimensions of a submissive, almost prayerful, anonymous figure.
50d   50d 359d Utopia paper and plastic packaging on canvas 10" H x 10" W x 1-1/2" D 2016 I've recently started to view my work, overall, as a series of fleeting solutions to an ever-morphing puzzle. Here, I will describe each of my entries individually.
Beginning with Present Memory - a somewhat ephemeral gift to myself, of restraint, of organization, and insight. The gray bow has come to represent guilt for me, because I purchased it at a party supply store.  Surprisingly, they had what I wanted, but because it was new, I later felt it a bit wasteful to use it.  The paper flower, too, though I painted that one. I kept them both in, because changing the situation would have thrown the whole piece off balance.  So guilt remains - is even reinforced, since now it seems a silly overreaction.  The painted seagull is based upon a photo I took from my parents' pier on the Magothy River near the Chesapeake Bay.  Like me, it's a scavenger.  Other birds are there for the tones, as support.  The one waiting on top is a spirit.  The rainbow's apex is an imagined microscopic view of one.  The pier, trod upon by glow-in-the-dark slippers, leads to a vaguely recalled festivity, or maybe a fantasy.  In the center, a girl gradually fades, sketched in acrylic from a mid-20th century yearbook photo, becoming a phantom.  The round gray glass element, I sliced, then kiln slumped, its understated shine mediating between the generally light-absorbent matte surfaces of the piece, and the glittering, reflective line of sequins.
My next submission, Yawn - an empathetic reflex.
I very much enjoy creating minimalistic assemblages.
(Though Present Memory and Yawn are not a diptych in the sense of having been designed to be juxtaposed, they are certainly paired in an energetic way. Optimally, they would be allowed to hang as a couple).
My third piece, How Low - working, again, within a square of several inches, an exploration of balance, layers, and line.  A language unknown to me, further obscured with washes of acrylic and other bits of ephemera. A cavernous, warm-hued form I return to from time to time looms above the measured dimensions of a submissive, almost prayerful, anonymous figure.
51a   51a 361a 30 days of reflection, oil, ink and resin on wooden panels, 39" x 25" 2013 I have a certain obsession that drives me and my artistic practice. I am compelled to pursue the transient, to glimpse the dynamic and unstable. In my recent works I am interested in micro-flows and little happenings in daily life that the mind would normally stabilize and flush away: the small, the marginal, the in-between. Nothing is stable. Everything is an event and relational.
I paint events that do not belong to a specific place, have no context or origins, and are caused by anybody and everybody. It can be as simple as cigarette smoke, the splash in a puddle, the circles spreading on the water. Despite their simplicity, none of these little happenings will be exactly the same, and will change in each moment according to the rules of nature and passing time. I explore the impossibility of capturing them.
I find that painting, with its long history of representation, is the best medium for this subject. In order to find a way to represent the transient, I study techniques from the Old Masters, and continue to search for new tools and mediums. My process of painting often involves repetition and many layers, and becomes a ritual or meditation.
51b   51b 361b 10 days reflection on smoke and space oil, ink and resin on wooden panels, 20"X20"X8" 2015 I have a certain obsession that drives me and my artistic practice. I am compelled to pursue the transient, to glimpse the dynamic and unstable. In my recent works I am interested in micro-flows and little happenings in daily life that the mind would normally stabilize and flush away: the small, the marginal, the in-between. Nothing is stable. Everything is an event and relational.
I paint events that do not belong to a specific place, have no context or origins, and are caused by anybody and everybody. It can be as simple as cigarette smoke, the splash in a puddle, the circles spreading on the water. Despite their simplicity, none of these little happenings will be exactly the same, and will change in each moment according to the rules of nature and passing time. I explore the impossibility of capturing them.
I find that painting, with its long history of representation, is the best medium for this subject. In order to find a way to represent the transient, I study techniques from the Old Masters, and continue to search for new tools and mediums. My process of painting often involves repetition and many layers, and becomes a ritual or meditation.
52a   52a 362a SpottieARTiedopalicious Acrylic Painting 30" x 40" 2016 My work transforms the familiar primarily via color selection and the painterly qualities present when painting by hand.  Popular culture is a vital reference for me throughout the creative process. I am drawn to working with acrylic paint and through silk screen printing. Punk music, hip hop and skateboard and surf culture are all huge influences of mine. I prefer complementary, vibrant colors and lines. I enjoy creating tension for the viewer visually and intellectually.  I am interested in the tension a composition holds when seemingly contradictory elements are present--tension created through specific color and semiotic creative decisions in my compositions.
52b   52b 362b Tongue Tied Acrylic Painting 30" x 40" 2014 My work transforms the familiar primarily via color selection and the painterly qualities present when painting by hand.  Popular culture is a vital reference for me throughout the creative process. I am drawn to working with acrylic paint and through silk screen printing. Punk music, hip hop and skateboard and surf culture are all huge influences of mine. I prefer complementary, vibrant colors and lines. I enjoy creating tension for the viewer visually and intellectually.  I am interested in the tension a composition holds when seemingly contradictory elements are present--tension created through specific color and semiotic creative decisions in my compositions.
53a   53a 363a Orange Presby Iris with Purple archival pigment print/photography 19 x 19 2015 I hope that my best photographic work occupies a place where art and photography coalesce. Because of my background in graphic design, I am fascinated by the ways in which floral and plant images can be manipulated on the computer in order to create a mood or suggest a period of time or even a movement in the art world.
My ordinary yet colorful photographic images completely change
character when I transform them into an ancient symbol called
the Mandala.  A Mandala is traditionally used to signify a sacred space containing a circle with a center point that offers balancing visual elements, symbolizing unity and harmony.
The original photographs were taken on my travels through market places, botanical gardens, arboretums, flower shows and roadside stands in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Israel, Italy, Jordan, the Netherlands, and Spain.
My background facts are simple: I went to Skidmore where I studied both fine art and photography. I graduated with honors. I won awards as art director in advertising. Now that my children are grown, I am returning to my roots but testing my wings, experimenting with photograph as fine art. And wow, am I loving the journey,
NO IMAGE AVAILABLE   53b 363b Pinwheels Mandala archival pigment print/photography 19 x 19 2016 I hope that my best photographic work occupies a place where art and photography coalesce. Because of my background in graphic design, I am fascinated by the ways in which floral and plant images can be manipulated on the computer in order to create a mood or suggest a period of time or even a movement in the art world.
My ordinary yet colorful photographic images completely change
character when I transform them into an ancient symbol called
the Mandala.  A Mandala is traditionally used to signify a sacred space containing a circle with a center point that offers balancing visual elements, symbolizing unity and harmony.
The original photographs were taken on my travels through market places, botanical gardens, arboretums, flower shows and roadside stands in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Israel, Italy, Jordan, the Netherlands, and Spain.
My background facts are simple: I went to Skidmore where I studied both fine art and photography. I graduated with honors. I won awards as art director in advertising. Now that my children are grown, I am returning to my roots but testing my wings, experimenting with photograph as fine art. And wow, am I loving the journey,
54a   54a 364a Connectivity Acrylic on Canvases 46" x 36" 2015 My abstract work focuses on how the commonality of daily experiences connects us. Each painting is comprised of a collection of patterns that represent things that people encounter on a daily basis such as: technology, spirituality, nature, etc. These patterns are surrounded and injected with strong tethers of lines that bridge them together, illustrating how these elements form a bond of collective understanding.
54b   54b 364b Between Heaven and Earth Acrylic on Canvases and Wood 35" x 40" 2016 My abstract work focuses on how the commonality of daily experiences connects us. Each painting is comprised of a collection of patterns that represent things that people encounter on a daily basis such as: technology, spirituality, nature, etc. These patterns are surrounded and injected with strong tethers of lines that bridge them together, illustrating how these elements form a bond of collective understanding.
54c   54c 364c Sunkissed and Moonstruck Acrylic on Canvases 20" x 10" 2016 My abstract work focuses on how the commonality of daily experiences connects us. Each painting is comprised of a collection of patterns that represent things that people encounter on a daily basis such as: technology, spirituality, nature, etc. These patterns are surrounded and injected with strong tethers of lines that bridge them together, illustrating how these elements form a bond of collective understanding.