January 24, 2008 7:00am, 2008.Archival pigment print, 30 x 40”.
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  EXHIBITIONS 2013-2014  
  TRIAD SERIES  
  ABSTRACT LIVES BY THE NUMBERS UNTITLED  
1670 IRVING STREET RAHWAY, NJ. (732) 381-7511. info@agnj.org

  abstract lives  
  SEPTEMBER 8 - OCTOBER 3, 2013  

  This Fall, Arts Guild New Jersey is presenting three exhibits curated by three independent curators. The set of the three exhibitions is titled the TRIAD SERIES. These shows will all feature the same eleven pre-selected artists, who were chosen for their large range of work and/or, the fact that they have many distinct bodies of work. The artists featured are Adel Gorgy, Eileen M. Foti, Neal Korn, Peter Jacobs, RoCa, Diane Savona, Rocco Scary, Tom Nussbaum, Frances Heinrich, Grigory Gurevich and Bill Westheimer.  
 

Through this project we aim to investigate how the artwork of the same artists might be viewed by several curators each with a distinct point of view.  We also want to determine what connections they may see during the review of the artwork of the featured artists that can lead to the establishment of a coherent theme or topic upon which the exhibit will hinge. The first of these exhibits is ABSTRACT LIVES, curated by Virginia Fabbri Butera Ph.D. who currently runs the Maloney Gallery at the College of Saint Elizabeth. The second show, scheduled to open in mid-October will be organized by Donna Gustafson who is currently a curator for the Zimmerli Museum in New Brunswick. The third and final show in the TRIAD SERIES will be developed for us by Jacki Cruz, the Director of Exhibits at the City WithStatement from curator Donna Gustafson on the theme of the By The Numbers exhibit: “This exhibition explores the presence of numbers as signs, symbols and found objects-- ocular proof of the systems of time and place that we construct around ourselves and the values we assign to things.  The presence of numbers in these works of art also provides proof of the strange beauty of random encounters. Numbers define space, mark time, and measure value, quantity, and the presence of absence.  In everyday life, numbers are ubiquitous -- we have identification numbers, social security numbers, passport numbers, lucky numbers, cell phone numbers, pin numbers, addresses, and zip codes. We live by adding and subtracting money to our bank accounts; some of us count calories as we eat; others play games with numbers; many of us purchase lottery tickets and explore probability and statisticsout Walls Gallery in Newark, NJ.

gorgy

ADELE GORGY 
January 24, 2008 7:00am
Archival pigment print, 2008.

 
 
korn
NEIL KORN
Electric Mambo,
Digital Photograph 2013.

. Statement from curator Virginia Fabbri Butera Ph.D. on the theme of the exhibit: “As I examined the work of each artist, I was struck by the frequency with which each has used bits and slices of colors, patterns, shapes, nature, objects and people to construct their art that, on first glance, often has no clear narrative or meaning. The “stories” they are presenting depend on our ability to make sense of the visually and/or physically collaged abstracted elements that are before us. Some works are similar to the early 20th century collages of Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, where we can sometimes see the outline of a recognizable face, body or form amid punctuating fragments. In other objects, the Surrealist principle of creating random or unusual juxtapositions of realistic items is at play.

 
 

The Surrealist founder André Breton was influenced by the Count de Lautréaumont’s remark “as beautiful as the chance encounter of a sewing machine and an umbrella on an operating table. In other words, objective reality is present in the objects but not in the circumstance in which they meet.  Still, other works that I selected operate in the realm of pure abstraction but consist nonetheless of the shards of art and life re-assembled into late 20th and early 21st century works that reflect the unease and distress of our rapidly changing social, political, and technological world. By mixing media and chopping the artistic-scape up into non-contextualized pieces, artists are commenting on what they see and feel, that parts cannot necessarily be push ed back together to become what we once knew and understood. But what does hold these works together is the emphasis on using the segments to build an abstract or quasi-abstract, as opposed to a realistic, field which is both visually and emotionally satisfying, even if we don’t really understand what it signifies. I therefore chose the title to embrace both pronunciations of “lives.” I see that abstract techniques and compositions are alive and well, and that artists are trying to comment on our abstractly collaged and refracted lives.” 

savona

DIANE SAVONA
Hiroshima. Hand sewn salvaged textiles with objects found in the Hiroshima River, 2012.

 
 
westh

BILL WESTHEIMER
Colfax
Collage of 12 Cibachrome prints,1984.

scary
ROCCO SCARY
Book 11
Handmade paper, steel and ink, 2001.
foti
EILEEN M. FOTI
Swimming Upstream
Lithography with metallic leaf, 2010.
 
         
Arts Guild New Jersey
1670 Irving Street
Rahway, New Jersey 07065
732-381-7511
Copyright © 2007 Arts Guild New Jersey
All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part in any medium
without express written permission is prohibited.
  EXHIBITIONS 2013-2014  
1670 IRVING STREET RAHWAY, NJ. (732) 381-7511. info@agnj.org

  abstract lives  
  SEPTEMBER 8 - OCTOBER 3, 2013  

  This Fall, Arts Guild New Jersey is presenting three exhibits curated by three independent curators. The set of the three exhibitions is titled the TRIAD SERIES. These shows will all feature the same eleven pre-selected artists, who were chosen for their large range of work and/or, the fact that they have many distinct bodies of work. The artists featured are Adel Gorgy, Eileen M. Foti, Neal Korn, Peter Jacobs, RoCa, Diane Savona, Rocco Scary, Tom Nussbaum, Frances Heinrich, Grigory Gurevich and Bill Westheimer.  
 

Through this project we aim to investigate how the artwork of the same artists might be viewed by several curators each with a distinct point of view.  We also want to determine what connections they may see during the review of the artwork of the featured artists that can lead to the establishment of a coherent theme or topic upon which the exhibit will hinge. The first of these exhibits is ABSTRACT LIVES, curated by Virginia Fabbri Butera Ph.D. who currently runs the Maloney Gallery at the College of Saint Elizabeth. The second show, scheduled to open in mid-October will be organized by Donna Gustafson who is currently a curator for the Zimmerli Museum in New Brunswick. The third and final show in the TRIAD SERIES will be developed for us by Jacki Cruz, the Director of Exhibits at the City WithStatement from curator Donna Gustafson on the theme of the By The Numbers exhibit: “This exhibition explores the presence of numbers as signs, symbols and found objects-- ocular proof of the systems of time and place that we construct around ourselves and the values we assign to things.  The presence of numbers in these works of art also provides proof of the strange beauty of random encounters. Numbers define space, mark time, and measure value, quantity, and the presence of absence.  In everyday life, numbers are ubiquitous -- we have identification numbers, social security numbers, passport numbers, lucky numbers, cell phone numbers, pin numbers, addresses, and zip codes. We live by adding and subtracting money to our bank accounts; some of us count calories as we eat; others play games with numbers; many of us purchase lottery tickets and explore probability and statisticsout Walls Gallery in Newark, NJ.

gorgy

ADELE GORGY 
January 24, 2008 7:00am
Archival pigment print, 2008.

 
 
korn
NEIL KORN
Electric Mambo,Digital Photograph 2013.

. Statement from curator Virginia Fabbri Butera Ph.D. on the theme of the exhibit: “As I examined the work of each artist, I was struck by the frequency with which each has used bits and slices of colors, patterns, shapes, nature, objects and people to construct their art that, on first glance, often has no clear narrative or meaning. The “stories” they are presenting depend on our ability to make sense of the visually and/or physically collaged abstracted elements that are before us. Some works are similar to the early 20th century collages of Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, where we can sometimes see the outline of a recognizable face, body or form amid punctuating fragments. In other objects, the Surrealist principle of creating random or unusual juxtapositions of realistic items is at play.

 
 

The Surrealist founder André Breton was influenced by the Count de Lautréaumont’s remark “as beautiful as the chance encounter of a sewing machine and an umbrella on an operating table. In other words, objective reality is present in the objects but not in the circumstance in which they meet.  Still, other works that I selected operate in the realm of pure abstraction but consist nonetheless of the shards of art and life re-assembled into late 20th and early 21st century works that reflect the unease and distress of our rapidly changing social, political, and technological world. By mixing media and chopping the artistic-scape up into non-contextualized pieces, artists are commenting on what they see and feel, that parts cannot necessarily be push ed back together to become what we once knew and understood. But what does hold these works together is the emphasis on using the segments to build an abstract or quasi-abstract, as opposed to a realistic, field which is both visually and emotionally satisfying, even if we don’t really understand what it signifies. I therefore chose the title to embrace both pronunciations of “lives.” I see that abstract techniques and compositions are alive and well, and that artists are trying to comment on our abstractly collaged and refracted lives.” 

savona

DIANE SAVONA
Hiroshima
Hand sewn textiles with objects from the Hiroshima River, 2012.

 
 
westh

BILL WESTHEIMER
Colfax
Collage of 12 Cibachrome prints,1984.

scary
ROCCO SCARY
Book 11
Handmade paper, steel and ink, 2001.
foti
EILEEN M. FOTI
Swimming Upstream
Lithography with metallic leaf, 2010.
 
         
Arts Guild New Jersey
1670 Irving Street
Rahway, New Jersey 07065
732-381-7511
Copyright © 2007 Arts Guild New Jersey
All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part in any medium
without express written permission is prohibited.